Sunday, May 30, 2010

 

This Week's Birthdays (May 30 - June 5)

Happy Birthday this week to:

May 30
1909 ● Benny Goodman → Bandleader, clarinetist, The "King of Swing"
1944 ● Lenny DavidsonDave Clark Five
1955 ● Nicholas Bowen "Topper" HeadonThe Clash
1958 ● Marie Fredriksson → Roxette
1960 ● Stephen DuffyDuran Duran, Tin Tin, "Kiss Me" (1982)
1964 ● Tom Morello → Rage Against The Machine
1964 ● Wynonna Judd (Christina Ciminella) → The Judds, solo, "To Be Loved By You" (1996)
1971 ● Patrick Dalheimer → Live, The Gracious Few

May 31
1938 ● Johnny Paycheck (Donald Eugene Lytle) → "Take This Job And Shove It" (1977)
1938 ● Peter YarrowPeter, Paul & Mary
1944 ● Mick Ralphs → Mott The Hoople
1947 ● William "Junior" Campbell → The Gaylords, The Marmalade
1948 ● John Henry "Bonzo" BonhamLed Zeppelin
1962 ● Corey Hart → "Never Surrender" (1985)
1963 ● Wendy Smith → Prefab Sprout
1964 ● Darryl McDaniels → Run-D.M.C.
1965 ● Steve White → Style Council

Jun 01
1921 ● Nelson Riddle → Composer, arranger, producer (Sinatra)
1934 ● Pat Boone → Top 40 pop singer, TV host, author
1945 ● Linda Scott (Linda Joy Sampson) → "I've Told Every Little Star" (1961)
1947 ● Ron Wood → Faces, Rolling Stones
1950 ● Charlene Marilyn D'Angelo → "I've Never Been To Me" (1982)
1950 ● Graham Russell → Air Supply
1953 ● Ronnie Dunn → Brooks & Dunn
1960 ● Simon GallupThe Cure
1963 ● Alan WilderDepeche Mode, Recoil, producer
1963 ● Mike Joyce → The Smiths
1968 ● Jason Donovan → Teen idol, "Especially For You" (1968)
1974 ● Alanis Morissette → "Ironic" (1996)

Jun 02
1937 ● Jimmy Jones → "Handy Man" (1960)
1939 ● Charles Miller → War, "Spill The Wine" (1970)
1941 ● Charlie WattsRolling Stones
1941 ● William Guest → The Five Du-Tones, Gladys Knight And The Pips
1943 ● Jimmy Castor → The Teenagers, Jimmy Castor Bunch, solo
1944 ● Marvin Hamlisch → Composer, arranger, "The Entertainer" (1973)
1947 ● Steve Brookins → .38 Special
1950 ● Antone Lee "Cubby" Tavares → Tavares
1954 ● Michael Susanne Steele → The Bangles
1957 ● Simon PhillipsToto, Judas Priest, Big Country
1960 ● Tony Hadley → Spandau Ballet, solo
1962 ● Thor Eldon Jonsson → The Sugarcubes
1970 ● B Real (Louis Freese) → Cypress Hill

Jun 03
1939 ● Ian Hunter (Patterson) → Mott the Hoople, solo
1942 ● Curtis Mayfield → R&B/soul giant, The Impressions, solo
1943 ● Mike Dennis → The Dovells, "The Bristol Stomp" (1961)
1946 ● Michael Clarke (Michael Dick) → Byrds, Flying Burrito Bros., Firefall
1947 ● Dave Alexander → The Stooges
1947 ● Mickey Finn (Michael Hearne) → T. Rex
1950 ● Deniece Williams (Chandler) → "Let's Hear It For The Boy" (1984)
1950 ● Suzi Quatro (Susan Kay Quatrocchio) → "Stumblin' In" (1979)
1952 ● Billy PowellLynyrd Skynyrd
1954 ● Dan Hill → "Sometimes When We Touch" (1977)
1971 ● Ariel and Gabriel Hernandez → No Mercy, "Where Do You Go" (1996)

Jun 04
1937 ● Freddy Fender (Baldemar Garza Huerta) → "Before The Next Teardrop Falls" (1975)
1940 ● Cliff Bennett → The Rebel Rousers
1944 ● Michelle Phillips (Holly Michelle Gilliam) → Mamas & The Papas
1944 ● Roger Ball → Average White Band
1945 ● Anthony Braxton → Jazz reedman, bandleader, composer
1945 ● Gordon Waller → Peter & Gordon, "A World Without Love" (1969)
1961 ● Eldra DeBarge → DeBarge, "Rhythm Of The Night" (1984)
1974 ● Stefan Lessard → Dave Matthews Band

Jun 05
1926 ● Bill Hayes → Country-pop singer, "The Ballad Of Davy Crockett" (1955)
1941 ● Floyd Lawrence Butler → The Friends Of Distinction
1946 ● Freddie StoneSly & the Family Stone, Graham Central Station
1947 ● Laurie Anderson → "O Superman" (1981)
1947 ● Tom Evans → Badfinger
1950 ● Ronnie Dyson → Lead singer in "Hair" (1968)
1954 ● Michael Henry "Nicko" McBrain → Iron Maiden
1954 ● Pete Erskine → Session drummer, Weather Report, Steely Dan
1956 ● Kenny G. (Kenneth Gorelick) → "Forever In Love" (1992)
1956 ● Richard Butler → Psychedelic Furs, Love Split Love
1964 ● Mags (Margaret Dunn) → Fuzzbox
1969 ● Brian McKnight → R&B/soul, "Love Is" (1993)
1970 ● Clause Noreen → Aqua, "Barbie Girl" (1996)
1971 ● Mark "Marky Mark" Wahlberg → Funky Bunch, Prince Pal Joe, actor
1974 ● Aaron "P-Nut" Wills → 311, solo, producer
1981 ● Sebastien Lefebvre → Simple Plan

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Saturday, May 29, 2010

 

Album of the Day: Crosby, Stills & Nash (5/29/69)

An instant classic upon its release 40 years ago, super trio Crosby, Stills & Nash’s self-titled debut LP featured their trademark close, rich harmonies and each member’s unique songwriting talents in nearly equal doses. Timely social and political statements mark each track, and the whole is one melodic celebration of late-60s folk-rock.

Crosby, Stills & Nash spawned two singles, the somewhat bubblegum-ish “Marrakesh Express” (backed with “Helplessly Hoping”) and the perennial “Suite: Judy Blues Eyes” (b/w “Long Time Gone,” David Crosby’s lament to the Robert Kennedy assassination a year earlier), but neither made it into the Top 20 (the album itself hit #6 in the U.S.). Add the sweet ballad of “Guinnevere,” the mystic “Wooden Ships” (co-written by Crosby, Stephen Stills and Paul Kantner of the Jefferson Airplane), Stills’ warbling electric guitar in “Pre-Road Downs” and the toe-tapper “You Don’t Have To Cry,” and it’s not surprising that Crosby, Stills & Nash is one of the top debut albums of all time (it’s #4 on my Top 25 Debut Album list) and a quintessential example of the flourishing light country-folk-rock of the time (along with the ByrdsSweetheart Of The Rodeo and The Grateful Dead’s Workingman’s Dead, among others).

A recommended buy, the CD or mp3 downloads are on Amazon. The entire album or individual tracks can be downloaded from iTunes, and a CSN (& Young) playlist is in the Playlist Vault.

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Wednesday, May 26, 2010

 

Album of the Day: Frank Zappa (5/26/67)

The debut album by The Mothers Of Invention, Freak Out!, sold a disappointing 30,000 copies when first released in 1966. But it nonetheless garnered enthusiastic critical acclaim (including #243 on the Rolling Stone Top 500 list). Undeterred by an early failure, the band soldiered on, releasing Absolutely Free in May 26, 1967. Led by musical genius Frank Zappa and allowing no known genre of music to remain off the record, The Mothers provided a cacophony of sounds, both instrumental and vocal, with references to works from Stravinsky to the Kingsmen (“Louie Louie”).

Absolutely Free is a wacky, psychotic, outside-the-box menagerie of Zappa’s talent for the unexpected, which led to nearly fifty other albums (and 20 posthumous) before his death in 1993. It’s very much worth a listen, and can be purchased as a CD or mp3 downloads at Amazon (but not iTunes). Frank Zappa and The Mothers best tracks are in the Playlist Vault at DrRock.com.

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Monday, May 24, 2010

 

Album of the Day: Jimmy Buffett (5/24/94)

Jimmy Buffett’s May 24, 1994 release, Fruitcakes is a typical Buffett album with tropical sounds and topics, light lyrics and gentle rhythms – just the sort of beach pirate, laissez faire Caribbean wind-blown lifestyle his persona and business career have espoused over more than three decades. But Fruitcakes reached #5 on the Billboard album chart and eventually went platinum, a rare double for a Buffett album and evidence that it is one of the best five or six discs in his catalogue.

The sun, surf and sand elements of Fruitcakes are best heard (or dreamed of) from a beach chair with a rum cocktail in hand on a sunny afternoon outside a thatched hut facing an azure sea with palm trees gently swaying in the breeze. “Apocalypso,” “Lone Palm,” “Everybody’s Got A Cousin In Miami,” a mellow take on the Kinks’ “Sunny Afternoon” and a steel-drum cover of the Grateful Dead’s “Uncle John’s Band” all set that space and mood. The rest is a smooth but not serious concoction of quirky Buffett styles, including languid ballads (“Delaney Talks To Statues”), light country-rock (“Six Sting Music”), the ranting complaints about supersizing and politically correctness in the punchy title track, and the harder, bluesy horn-and-harp workout in “Vampires, Mummies And The Holy Ghost.”

Fruitcakes is a great starting point for a neo-Parrothead (as hard-core Buffett fans are known) and can be downloaded or purchased as a CD from Amazon and iTunes. Jimmy Buffett’s Top 25 tracks are in the Playlist Vault.

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Sunday, May 23, 2010

 

This Week's Birthdays (May 23 - 29)

Happy Birthday this week to:

May 23
1918 ● Robert "Bumps" Blackwell → Producer, Specialty Records executive
1921 ● Humphrey Lyttleton → Jazz bandleader, trumpeteer, radio host
1928 ● Rosemary Clooney → Adult pop singer, actress
1934 ● Robert Moog → Synthesizer developer and musician
1943 ● "General" Norman Johnson → The Showmen, Chairmen Of The Board
1946 ● Danny Klein → J. Geils Band
1947 ● Bill HuntElectric Light Orchestra
1953 ● Rick Fenn → 10cc
1955 ● Jim Mankey → Concrete Blonde
1957 ● Thereza Bazar → Guys N' Dolls, Dollar, solo
1967 ● Frederick "Junior" Waite → Musical Youth, "Pass The Dutchie" (1982)
1967 ● Phil Selway → Radiohead
1973 ● Maxwell (Gerald Maxwell Rivera) → Neo-soul, "Fortunate" (1999)
1974 ● Jewel (Kilcher) → "You Were Meant For Me" (1996)

May 24
1941 ● Bob Dylan (Robert Allen Zimmerman) → "Like A Rolling Stone" (1965)
1942 ● Derek Quinn → Freddie & The Dreamers
1944 ● Patti LaBelle (Patricia Holt) → Soul diva, The Blue Belles, LaBelle, solo
1946 ● Steve Upton → Wishbone Ash
1947 ● Albert Bouchard Blue Öyster Cult
1955 ● Rosanne Cash → Daughter of Johnny, "Seven Year Ache" (1981)
1967 ● Heavy D (Dwight Myers) → Rapper, The Boyz, "Now That We Found Love" (1991)
1969 ● Rich Robinson → The Black Crowes
1988 ● Billy Gilman → Youngest country Top 20 singer, "One Voice" (2000)

May 25
1921 ● Hal David → Pop/MOR lyricist, co-wrote with Burt Bacharach
1936 ● Tom T. Hall → Country singer, wrote "Harper Valley P.T.A." (1968)
1942 ● Brian "Blinky" Davison → The Nice, Refugee
1943 ● Jessi Colter (Miriam Johnson) → Wife of Waylon Jennings, "I'm Not Lisa" (1975)
1943 ● John Michael "Poli" Palmer → Family
1947 ● Mitch Margo → The Tokens, "The Lion Sleeps Tonight" (1962)
1948 ● Klaus Meine → Scorpions
1950 ● Robby SteinhardtKansas, solo
1955 ● John Grimaldi → Argent
1958 ● John William "Paul" Weller → The Jam, The Style Council, solo
1975 ● Lauryn Hill → The Fugees, solo

May 26
1926 ● Miles Dewey Davis III → Jazz bandleader, trumpeteer, composer
1939 ● Jaki Liebezeit → Canadian singer/songwriter, "Wondering Where The Lions Are" (1979)
1940 ● Levon HelmThe Band, solo, producer
1942 ● Ray Ennis → Swinging Blue Jeans, "Hippy Hippy Shake" (1964)
1944 ● Terence "Verden" Allen → Mott The Hoople
1944 ● Vicki Lawrence (Vicki Ann Axelrod) → Actress, comedienne, singer, "The Night The Lights Went Out In Georgia" (1973)
1945 ● Garry Peterson → The Guess Who
1949 ● Randall Hank Williams, Jr. → "Honky Tonkin'" (1982)
1949 ● Stephanie Lynn ("Stevie") NicksFleetwood Mac, solo
1958 ● Wayne Hussey (Jerry Lovelock) → Dead Or Alive, The Sisters Of Mercy, The Mission
1962 ● Colin Vearncombe → Black
1964 ● Leonard Albert "Lenny" Kravitz → "Are You Gonna Go My Way" (1993)

May 27
1932 ● Junior Parker (Hermon Parker, Jr.) → Memphis blues/soul vocalist
1935 ● Ramsey Lewis → Jazz/pop pianist
1943 ● Cilla Black (Priscilla White) → "You're My World" (1964)
1945 ● Bruce Cockburn → Canadian singer/songwriter, "Wondering Where The Lions Are" (1979)
1947 ● Marty Kristian → The New Seekers
1948 ● Pete Sears → Hot Tuna, Jefferson Starship
1957 ● Eddie Harsch → The Black Crowes
1957 ● Siouxsie Sioux (Susan Dallion) → Siouxsie & The Banshees
1958 ● Neil Finn → Crowded House, Split Enz, Finn Brothers
1966 ● Sean Kinney → Alice In Chains
1971 ● Lisa Nicole "Left Eye" Lopes → TLC
1975 ● Andre 3000 (Andre Benjamin) → OutKast

May 28
1910 ● Aaron Thibeaux "T. Bone" Walker → Electric blues pioneer, "Stormy Monday" (1947)
1917 ● John Henry "Papa John" CreachJefferson Airplane/Starship, Hot Tuna, solo
1930 ● Prince Buster (Cecil Bustamonte Campbell) → Reggae/ska singer, producer
1943 ● Tony Mansfield → The Dakotas, Naked Eyes
1944 ● Billy Vera (William McCord, Jr.) → Billy Vera & Judy Clay, "Storybook Children" (1967)
1944 ● Gladys Knight → Soul diva, The Pips, solo
1945 ● John FogertyCreedence Clearwater Revival, solo
1948 ● Ray Laidlaw → Brethren, Lindisfarne
1949 ● Wendy O. Williams → Plasmatics
1955 ● Edwin "Eddie" JobsonJethro Tull, Roxy Music, U.K.
1955 ● John McGeoch → Siouxsie & The Banshees, solo
1959 ● Steve Strange → Visage
1961 ● Roland Gift → Fine Young Cannibals
1964 ● Wes Burt-Martin → Edie Brickell & The New Bohemians
1968 ● Kylie Minogue → "The Loco-Motion" (1988)
1970 ● Mark Richardson → Skunk Anansie
1981 ● Mark Feehily → Westlife
1985 ● Colbie Caillat → Pop singer/guitarist, "Bubbly" (2007)

May 29
1941 ● Roy Crewsdon → Freddie & The Dreamers
1945 ● Gary Brooker → Procol Harum, solo
1949 ● Francis Rossi → The Spectres, Status Quo
1950 ● Maureen "Rebbie" Jackson → The Jacksons, solo
1953 ● Danny Elfman → Composer, singer/songwriter, Oingo Boingo
1955 ● Mike ProcaroToto
1956 ● Larry Blackmon → Cameo
1959 ● Mel Gaynor → Simple Minds
1960 ● Jesse Johnson → The Time, "Jungle Love" (1984), solo
1961 ● Melissa Etheridge → Singer/songwriter, "Bring Me Some Water" (1989), gay activist
1967 ● Noel Gallagher → Oasis
1969 ● Chandler "Chad" Kinchla → Blues Traveler
1975 ● Melanie "Scary Spice" Brown → Spice Girls

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Saturday, May 22, 2010

 

Album of the Day: The Monkees (5/22/67) 43 Years!

Derided as the “Pre-Fab Four,” The Monkees suffered endless attacks on their credibility and capabilities as musicians following the release of their first two albums in 1966 and early 1967. Critics pointed out that the band – Mike Nesmith, Peter Tork, Micky Dolenz and Davy Jones – was assembled just for a TV show and could barely play their assigned instruments. That all changed quite quickly when Colgems issued The Monkees’ Headquarters on May 22, 1967.

The band had demanded – and won – artistic control over their recordings, ousting creative supervisor Don Kirshner in the process. The four penned half the songs on the new album and performed nearly all of the instrumentation. Nesmith, Tork and Dolenz each contributed at least one notable track to the effort, and Jones joined the other three to write two songs credited to the band as a unit. Headquarters is an eclectic mix of Brill Building pop, Nesmith country-rockers, sappy Davy Jones ballads and a Dolenz original, “Randy Scouse Git,” that is as far from the happy-go-lucky sounds of “Last Train To Clarksville” as you’ll ever hear on a Monkees record. There isn’t a hit to be found on Headquarters, yet it’s the Monkees’ best all-around album.

Headquarters hit #1 on the Billboard 200 chart in late May 1967 and was replaced at the top spot by Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band when it came out on June 1. Headquarters then spent 11 weeks in the #2 position. The Monkees are in the Playlist Vault and Headquarters is available on Amazon and iTunes.

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Thursday, May 20, 2010

 

Album of the Day: Marvin Gaye (5/20/71) 39 Years!

Marvin Gaye almost single-handedly revolutionized soul music when Motown released his self-produced What’s Goin’ On on March 20, 1971. The first overtly socially and politically charged soul album, it’s full of statements (hence no question mark in the title) about war, race, hate, inner cities, abandoned children. It rolled up all of the late-60s social issues into one neat package that Motown leader Berry Gordy would have rejected save for Marvin’s threat to walk if Gordy withheld the album.

But What’s Goin’ On is far more than a period piece. It was a radical departure from the upbeat, soul-pop of 60s Motown. It’s lush and languid and it flows without the sugar coating of Gaye’s earlier Motown classics. It allows long-time Motown session band the Funk Brothers to open up and deliver a jazzy river of drifting funk underneath Gaye’s experimental double vocals. It led the way to a new Motown sound from Stevie Wonder, Michael Jackson and others. And it was the last Motown release before Gordy left Detroit for Los Angeles, leaving Hitsville, USA and all that great music behind.

The best soul album ever? Possibly. The best Motown album by a solo artist? Absolutely! What’s Goin’ On sat at the top of the U.S. R&B charts for 9 weeks and reached a remarkable but not surprising #6 on the pop album chart. It’s ranked #1 on my Top 25 R&B/Soul album list and Marvin Gaye’s best tracks are in the Playlist Vault at DrRock.com. What’s Goin’ On can be downloaded or purchased as a CD from Amazon and iTunes.

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Wednesday, May 19, 2010

 

Album of The Day: Spiral Staircase (5/19/69) 41 Years!

Save for a couple of retrospective compilations, Spiral Starecase was a one-hit, one-album wonder from the late 60s. But that one hit, “More Today Than Yesterday” and the rest of the band’s lone LP are far deeper than most single-shot groups. In fact, many (including me) consider More Today Than Yesterday to be one of the finest of the late 60s upbeat pop-rock albums (the LP was released on May 19, 1969). Unfortunately, Spiral Starecase only got one shot at the limelight; within months of More Today Than Yesterday, the band broke up amidst financial and personnel turmoil.

Spiral Starecase began life as a Northern California, Vegas-style lounge act called the Fydallions after winning a local talent contest in Sacramento, CA. Four years on the Ramada Inn circuit perfected their engaging blend of MOR pop, ringing guitar hooks, backing horns and the unmistakable sound of lead singer Pat Upton’s vocals. Their brassy pop-rock mimicked chart-toppers Blood, Sweat & Tears, Chicago and Ides Of March, but minus the obvious jazz influences. However, fame (and fortune) was elusive, as only “More Today Than Yesterday” gathered any respect (#12 in the U.S. in mid-1969) and a second single, “She’s Ready” proved not to be.

Upton’s vocals, the band’s great sounds and the overall sunny feel of Spiral Staircase should have gone farther than just one release. To relive what might have been, click here for a preview and mp3 download or CD purchase of More Today Than Yesterday.

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Tuesday, May 18, 2010

 

Album of the Day: David Bowie (5/18/79)

Released on May 18, 1979, David Bowie’s Lodger was the final disc in the “Berlin Trilogy” of albums he recorded in collaboration with Roxy Music keyboardist and ambient music pioneer Brian Eno. Along with 1977’s Low and Heroes, Lodger reflects Bowie’s relocation to Berlin, his fascination with contemporary German rock music, and the zeitgeist of living and experiencing the divided city at the height of the Cold War.

Lodger is the most audience-accessible of the three Berlin albums. Whereas Low and Heroes are pervasive with heavy instrumentals, Lodger has none. Its brighter melodies and pop sounds were still mostly experimental in nature, but “Boys Keep Swinging” managed to break the Top 10 at #7 on the U.K. charts and the album as a whole reached #4. That Lodger largely failed to make a dent in the U.S. market is not surprising. The heavy handed Eno-induced synthesizers and Krautrock influences of Lodger did not play well to American listeners who were just beginning to tune to heavy metal and its offshoots. Even though Kraftwerk’s break into the U.S. airwaves with the hypnotic Trans-Europe Express album came ahead of Lodger in 1977, Kraftwerk, while ultimately a highly influential sound, was still viewed as more of a novelty than a serious contender in the U.S. in 1979.

Lodger is underrated at best, but only serious Bowie fans will really appreciate its existential tones and European influences. If you’re adventurous, give it a try on Amazon and iTunes. The less adventurous can sample my Top 25 Bowie tracks in the Playlist Vault.

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Sunday, May 16, 2010

 

This Week's Birthdays (May 16 - May 22)

Happy Birthday this week to:

May 16
1919 ● (Wladziu Valentino) Liberace → Campy pianist and showman
1944 ● Billy Cobham → Mahavishnu Orchestra, solo
1946 ● Robert Fripp → King Crimson, solo
1946 ● Roger Earl → Foghat, Savoy Brown
1947 ● Barbara Lee → The Chiffons, "He's So Fine" (1963)
1947 ● Darrell Sweet → Nazereth, "Love Hurts" (1975)
1951 ● Jonathan Richman → Modern Lovers, solo
1953 ● Richard Page → Mr. Mister
1955 ● Hazel O'Connor → "Will You" (1981)
1958 ● Glenn Gregory → Heaven 17
1965 ● Krist "Chris" NovoselicNirvana
1966 ● Janet Jackson → "Miss You Much" (1989)

May 17
1938 ● Pervis Jackson → The Spinners
1941 ● Malcolm Hale → Spanky & Our Gang
1942 ● Taj Mahal (Henry St. Clair Fredericks) → Rising Sons, solo,
1944 ● Jesse Winchester → "Yankee Lady" (1970)
1944 ● Richard Schwartz → Quotations
1949 ● Bill Bruford → King Crimson, Yes, U.K., solo
1952 ● Roy Adams → Climax Blues Band
1953 ● George Johnson → Brothers Johnson
1959 ● Paul Di’Anno (Andrews) → Iron Maiden
1961 ● Enya (Eithne Ni Bhraonain) → "Orinoco Flow (Sail Away)" (1988)
1962 ● Tracey Bryn → Voice Of The Beehive
1964 ● Dave Abbruzzese → Pearl Jam
1965 ● Homer O’Dell → Mint Condition
1965 ● Trent Reznor → Nine Inch Nails
1970 ● Darnell Van Rensalier → Shai
1970 ● Jordan Knight → New Kids On The Block
1976 ● Kandi Burruss → Xscape

May 18
1911 ● Joseph Vernon "Big Joe" Turner → "Shake, Rattle And Roll" (1954)
1912 ● Pierino Ronald "Perry" Como → "Catch A Falling Star" (1958)
1942 ● Rodney Dillard → The Dillards
1944 ● Albert Hammond → "It Never Rains In Southern California" (1973)
1949 ● Bill Wallace → Guess Who
1949 ● Rick Wakeman → The Strawbs, Yes
1952 ● George Strait → "All My Ex's Live In Texas" (1987)
1953 ● Feliciano "Butch" Tavares → Tavares
1958 ● Toyah Ann Wilcox → Toyah, "It's A Mystery" (1981)
1969 ● Martika (Marta Marrero) → Teen-pop, "Toy Soldiers" (1989)

May 19
1932 ● Alma Cogan (Cohen) → Brit pop, "Dreamboat" (1955)
1940 ● Mickey Newbury → Country songwriter, "An American Trilogy" (1971)
1945 ● Pete TownshendThe Who, solo
1947 ● Gregory HerbertBlood, Sweat & Tears
1947 ● Jerry HymanBlood, Sweat & Tears
1947 ● Paul Brady → Irish folk-pop, "Nobody Knows" (1990)
1947 ● Steve Currie → T. Rex
1948 ● Tom Scott → Saxophonist, composer, bandleader (L. A. Express)
1949 ● Joe Michael "Dusty" HillZZ Top
1951 ● Joey Ramone (Jeffrey Hyman) → The Ramones
1952 ● Barbara Joyce Lomas → B.T. Express
1952 ● Grace Jones (Mendoza) → The "Queen of the Gay Discos", actress
1954 ● Phillip RuddAC/DC
1956 ● Martyn "Teddy Bear" Ware → The Human League, Heaven 17
1962 ● Iain Harvie → Del Amitri
1963 ● Yazz (Yasmin Evans) → "The Only Way Is Up" (1988)
1972 ● Jenny Berggren → Ace Of Base

May 20
1942 ● Jill Jackson → Paul & Paula, "Hey Paula" (1963)
1944 ● John Robert "Joe" Cocker → "A Little Help From My Friends" (1968)
1946 ● Cher (Cherilyn Sarkisian LaPierre) → Sonny & Cher, "I Got You Babe" (1965)
1952 ● Warren Cann → Ultravox
1954 ● Jimmy Henderson → Black Oak Arkansas
1955 ● Steve George → Mr. Mister
1958 ● Jane Wiedlin → The Go-Go’s
1959 ● Susan Cowsill → The Cowsills, Continental Drifters
1961 ● Nick Heyward → Haircut 100, solo, "Kite" (1994)
1966 ● Tom Gorman → Belly
1972 ● Busta Rhymes (Trevor Smith, Jr.) → Rapper, "Woo-Hah!! Got You All In Check " (1996)
1972 ● Kit Clark → Danny Wilson, "Mary's Prayer" (1987)
1984 ● Naturi Naughton → 3LW

May 21
1904 ● Thomas Wright "Fats" Waller → Jazz pianist, "Ain't Misbehavin'" (1929)
1941 ● Ronald Isley → Isley Brothers
1943 ● Hilton Valentine → The Animals
1943 ● Vincent Crane → Atomic Rooster, Crazy World of Arthur Brown
1944 ● Marcie Blaine (Marcia Blank) → "Bobby's Girl" (1962)
1947 ● Bill Champlin → Sons Of Champlin, Chicago
1948 ● Gerard Hugh "Leo" Sayer → "You Make Me Feel Like Dancing" (1976)
1955 ● Stan LynchTom Petty & The Heartbreakers
1963 ● Tim Lever → Dead Or Alive, Modern Eon

May 22
1937 ● Kenny Ball → Kenny Ball & His Jazzman, "Midnight In Moscow" (1962)
1950 ● Bernie Taupin → Songwriter, lyricist for Elton John
1954 ● Jerry Dammers → Special A.K.A., The Specials, producer
1955 ● Iva Davies → Icehouse, "Electric Blue" (1987)
1959 ● Morrissey (Steven Patrick Morrissey) → The Smiths, solo
1962 ● Jesse Valenzuela → Gin Blossoms, solo
1966 ● Johnny Gill → New Edition, solo, "My, My, My" (1990)
1967 ● Dan Roberts → Crash Test Dummies

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Thursday, May 13, 2010

 

Album of the Day: Roger Daltrey (5/13/77)

A superstar in his own right for his fronting vocals with The Who, Roger Daltrey called on some top-notch songwriters and high-profile friends to support him on his moonlighting solo efforts. His third LP outside the sphere of The Who, One Of The Boys, was released on May 13, 1977. Unfortunately, like all his other solo albums, this one was a worthy effort but mostly a commercial bust.

Roger was not alone in carrying on a parallel solo career during breaks in The Who’s touring and recording schedules. Like guitarist/bandleader Pete Townshend and bassist John Entwistle, Daltrey issued 12 or more albums between the early 70s and mid-90s, and like the other two never found much success with his solo ventures. But for all three, stepping out from the band’s spotlight gave them a chance to go beyond The Who’s generally hard rock style. On One of the Boys Daltrey explores his own world, including a light country-rocker (“Single Man’s Dilemma” written by former Zombie Colin Blunstone and reminiscent of the New Riders), an exuberant pop-rocker penned by Paul McCartney (“Giddy”), a pounding rocker in the title track, and three mediocre tracks which he co-wrote. There’s some very good stuff here, just not enough to form a cohesive album or grab any but the most serious Daltrey fans (or devoted Who-spin-off collectors, if there is such a thing). Roger’s Under The Raging Moon (1985) is a better bet.

There’s a full 25 track playlist for The Who in the Playlist Vault, and One of the Boys can be purchased as a CD or mp downloads at Amazon.

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Wednesday, May 12, 2010

 

Album of the Day: Rolling Stones (5/12/72)

I previously opined (on April 23) that Sticky Fingers was one of the greatest rock albums of all time. Add Exile On Main Street (released May 12, 1972) to that list. The double album includes tracks the Rolling Stones recorded over four years, some from the Sticky Fingers sessions in England (early 1970 to ‘71), some from a trip to Los Angeles in early 1972, a few leftovers from as far back as 1968, and many from over six months of drug- and liquor-induced work at guitarist Keith Richards’ chateau-turned-party-house in southern France starting in mid-1971.

Exile On Main Street owes a good part of its existence to British taxing authorities. For reasons beyond this scope, the Stones accumulated more taxes than they could pay in the U.K. by early 1971. Choosing to flee across the Channel (and still further south) and start afresh, they reconnoitered at Richards’ vacation palace on the French Riviera. Of course, buried below the booze and stash in their baggage was their unparalleled ability to create the best hard rock, raunchy blues-rock and pure rock ‘n roll music the world has known. After several months on the Riviera scene, the result was one finished track (“Happy”) and a box of raw takes that would become Exile On Main Street when the Stones resumed recording in L.A. in early 1972.

Exile On Main Street is ragged and frayed and gloomy – pure Stones from the 70s. It’s a masterful blend of rock ‘n’ roll, blues, country and soul, fueled by booze and drugs and life in the fast lane. Downloads for mp3 players and CD purchases are on Amazon, and iPod downloads are on iTunes. Two Stones' playlists are in the Playlist Vault.

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Sunday, May 9, 2010

 

This Week's Birthdays (May 9 - 15)

Happy Birthday this week to:

May 09
1935 ● Nole Floyd "Nokie" Edwards → The Ventures, solo
1937 ● David Prater. Jr. → Sam & Dave
1937 ● Sonny CurtisBuddy Holly & The Crickets, solo, wrote "I Fought The Law"
1941 ● Peter Birrell → Freddie & The Dreamers
1942 ● Mike Millward → The Fourmost
1942 ● Tommy Roe → Bubblegum pop, "Jam Up Jelly Tight" (1969)
1943 ● Bruce Milner → Every Mother's Son
1944 ● Richie Furay → Buffalo Springfield, Poco, Souther Hillman Furay Band
1945 ● Steve Katz → Blues Project, Blood Sweat & Tears
1949 ● Billy Joel → "Piano Man" (1973)
1950 ● Tom PeterssonCheap Trick
1962 ● David GahanDepeche Mode
1962 ● Paul "P.D." Heaton → Housemartins, Beautiful South
1964 ● Kevin Sounderson → Inner City
1965 ● Ben Volpeliere-Pierrot → Curiosity Killed The Cat
1979 ● Pierre Bouvier → Simple Plan

May 10
1899 ● Fred Astaire (Frederick Austerlitz) → Dancer, actor, vocalist
1920 ● Bert Weedon → U.K. Pop-instrumental guitarist
1935 ● Larry Williams → Early rock & roll, "Dizzy, Miss Lizzy" (1957)
1938 ● Henry Fambrough → The Spinners
1941 ● Danny Rapp → Danny & The Juniors
1946 ● Dave MasonTraffic, solo
1946 ● Donovan Phillip Leitch → "Mellow Yellow" (1966)
1946 ● Graham Gouldman → 10cc
1947 ● John Arden "Jay" Ferguson → Spirit, Jo Jo Gunne, "Thunder Island" (1977)
1951 ● Ronald Banks → The Dramatics, "In The Rain" (1972)
1957 ● Sid Vicious (John Simon Ritchie) → Sex Pistols
1960 ● Bono (Paul Hewson) → U2, poet, activist
1962 ● Gerry Daley → China Crisis
1965 ● Chris "Krist" NovoselicNirvana
1967 ● Young M.C. (Marvin Young) → Rapper, "Bust A Move" (1989)
1980 ● Jason Dalyrimple → Soul For Real
1985 ● Ashley Poole → Dream

May 11
1888 ● Irving Berlin (Israel Isidore Baline) → Composer, lyricist, pianist
1938 ● Carla Bley (Borg) → 60s Free Jazz composer, keyboardist
1941 ● Eric Burdon → Animals, War
1943 ● Arnie Satin → The Dovells, "Bristol Stomp" (1961)
1943 ● Les Chardwick → Gerry & The Pacemakers
1947 ● Claude Hudson "Butch" TrucksAllman Brothers Band
1955 ● Jonathan "J.J." Jeczalik → Art Of Noise
1955 ● Mark Herndon → Alabama

May 12
1928 ● Burt Bacharach → Wrote 70 Top 40 U.S. hits
1942 ● Billy Swan → "I Can Help" (1974)
1942 ● Ian Dury → "Sex & Drugs & Rock & Roll" (1977)
1943 ● David Walker → Gary Lewis & The Playboys
1944 ● James Purify → James & Bobby Purify, "I'm Your Puppet" (1966)
1945 ● Ian McLagan → Faces/Small Faces
1945 ● Jayotis Washington → The Perusasions
1948 ● Steve Winwood → Spencer Davis Group, Blind Faith, Traffic, solo
1950 ● Billy Squier → "My Kinda Lover" (1981)
1950 ● John "Jocko" Marcellino → Sha Na Na
1955 ● Kix Brooks → Brooks & Dunn, solo
1961 ● Billy Duffy → The Cult, "She Sells Sanctuary" (1985)

May 13
1938 ● John Smith → The Monotones, "The Book Of Love" (1958)
1941 ● Joe Brown → "A Picture Of You" (1962)
1941 ● Ritchie Valens (Ricardo Valenzuela Reyes) → "La Bamba" (1958)
1943 ● Mary Wells → Motown R&B, "My Guy" (1964)
1945 ● "Blue Lou" Marini → Saxophonist, Blues Brothers Band, solo
1945 ● Richard "Magic Dick" Salwitz → J. Geils Band
1947 ● Peter Overend Watts → Mott the Hoople, producer
1950 ● Danny KirwanFleetwood Mac, solo
1950 ● Stevie Wonder (Stevland Hardaway Judkins) → "Superstition" (1972)
1951 ● Paul Thompson → Roxy Music, Concrete Blonde
1954 ● John Logan → "What's Another Year" (1980)
1963 ● Julian Brookhouse → Curiosity Killed The Cat
1966 ● Darius Rucker → Hootie & The Blowfish, solo

May 14
1934 ● Mike Preston (Jack Davies) → Boxer, singer, TV/film actor
1936 ● Bobby Darin (Walden Robert Cassotto) → "Mack The Knife" (1959)
1943 ● Jack Bruce → Bluesbreakers, Manfred Mann, Cream, West Bruce & Laing
1945 ● Derek "Lek" Leckenby → Herman's Hermits
1945 ● Gene CornishThe Rascals, Fotomaker, solo
1947 ● Al Ciner → Three Dog Night
1950 ● Arthur Grant → Edgar Broughton Band
1952 ● David ByrneTalking Heads, solo
1962 ● C.C. DeVille (Bruce Johannesson) → Poison
1962 ● Ian Astbury → The Cult
1966 ● Fabrice Morvan → Milli Vanilli
1966 ● Mike Inez → Alice In Chains
1969 ● Danny Wood → New Kids On The Block, solo
1973 ● Natalie Appleton → All Saints, Appleton
1973 ● Shanice (Wilson) → Motown R&B, "I Love Your Smile" (1991)

May 15
1918 ● Richard Edward "Eddy" Arnold → Top charting country singer
1937 ● Trini Lopez → Pop-rock vocals, "Lemon Tree" (1965)
1938 ● Lenny Welch → Pop vocals, "Since I Fell For You" (1963)
1942 ● Kay Toinette "K.T." Oslin → "Come Next Monday" (1990)
1947 ● Graham Goble → Little River Band, solo
1948 ● Brian Eno → Roxy Music, solo, producer, artist
1948 ● Gary Thain → Uriah Heep
1951 ● Dennis Fredericksen → Trillium, Toto, solo, sessions
1953 ● Mike Oldfield → "Tubular Bells" (1973)
1959 ● Andrew Eldritch → Sisters Of Mercy
1970 ● Prince Be (Attrell Cordes) → P.M. Dawn

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Saturday, May 8, 2010

 

Album of the Day: The Beatles (5/8/70) 40 Years!

The Beatles had broken up for good several months before Let It Be was released on May 8, 1970. And, while it is sequentially their last release, the music on Let It Be was actually recorded in January 1969, before the sessions that led to Abbey Road, so it really isn’t the Beatles last album per se. Either way, Let it Be is not a fitting swan song. It’s one of their weaker efforts and reflects the turmoil that was rending the band apart in their final year as a unit.

Let It Be does contain several gems (“Get Back,” “Across The Universe,” “Dig A Pony” and the title track are keepers), but they can’t hide a handful of disappointing throw-aways and an overdone Phil Spector production of “The Long And Winding Road.” Three of the tracks on Let It Be, “Dig A Pony,” “One After 909” and “I’ve Got A Feeling” were recorded during the famous rooftop, impromptu concert for family, friends and Apple Studios employees on January 30, 1969. Of the three rooftop tracks, only “Dig A Pony” has any value; the other two were more a novelty and evidence the loose nature of the “live” appearance.

The tail end of the Let It Be sessions and the brief outdoor show included Billy Preston, whom George Harrison brought in as a condition for returning after he walked out of the studio in frustration earlier in the month. Preston’s presence was a calming influence on the proceedings, and the band completed the tapes in February 1969 and moved onto Abbey Road, which came out in September 1969.

All in, Let It Be is not a great album, but it’s worth having in your Beatles collection. There are two Beatles playlists in the Playlist Vault and Let It Be is on Amazon (but not yet on iTunes).

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Thursday, May 6, 2010

 

Album of the Day: Poco (5/6/70) 40 Years!

Poco was the best of the early wave of light country-rock bands that formed in the late 60s. Poco paved the way for all that followed, including the Eagles. Their second album, the eponymous Poco, was released on May 6, 1970 and generated a good buzz among the critics and hippy folk/country types, but like most of their other albums, it fell short of expectations on the charts and in stores. Despite the quality and innovation of their music, Poco never found a mass audience, and the defection of key players over the years didn’t help. But Poco’s sustainability is unparalleled in the genre; the band’s still in action today.

Jim Messina and Richie Furay abandoned the derelict supergroup Buffalo Springfield in 1968 to form another in Poco during the rise of the L.A. country-rock craze. Joined by veterans-Rusty Young, George Grantham and Randy Meisner, the band’s first album, Pickin’ Up The Pieces (1969) showed huge promise as a genre groundbreaker. But bassist Meisner left afterwards (eventually to join the Eagles) and was replaced by Timothy B. Schmitt (another future Eagle) for Poco and the live LP Deliverin’ (1971). Paul Cotton replaced Messina in 1972 when the latter jumped to an MOR pop duo with Kenny Loggins, and Furay quit in 1973, frustrated by Poco’s lack of financial success. Grantham left in 1978, leaving Young and Cotton to forge ahead and find success with the Top 15 album Legend in 1979 (and its Top 20 hits “Crazy Love” and “Heart Of The Night”) and some decent albums in the 80s.

Poco is terrific light country-rock, with guitar hooks, vocal harmonies, pedal steel twang and an overall laidback sound that grabbed critics and FM radio listeners then and still has appeal today. Surprisingly, the album yielded no hits, despite an obvious candidate in “You Better Think Twice.” And then there’s the curious 18-minute jam on Side 2 titled “El Tonto Del Nadie Regrasa,” a Latin-flavored experiment that is far from a flop but makes you wonder what those guys were thinking. Poco the band is in Dr. Rock’s Playlist Vault and Poco the album is available on Amazon and iTunes.

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Wednesday, May 5, 2010

 

Album of the Day: Bob Seger (5/5/78) 32 Years!

Bob Seger spent twenty years ascending the rock ‘n roll ladder to national attention. From his earliest Detroit-area regional hit single (“East Side Story,” 1966) to the massively popular, Top 10 breakout album Night Moves in 1976, Seger steadily built his reputation as a solid rock ‘n roller first in southern Michigan, then through the Midwest and eventually, with Night Moves, all across America. His follow-up album, the aptly-named Stranger In Town (released on May 5, 1978, coincidentally his 33rd birthday), was his pointed comment on what he found at the top.

Rather than exalt in the life of a 70s rock superstar, Stranger In Town reflects on the faux gilt and glam of the spotlight (“Hollywood Nights”), suggests that Seger hasn’t changed (“Still The Same”) and yearns for the basics (“Old Time Rock & Roll”). For Seger, celebrity can’t buy love (“Ain’t Got No Money”), old flames never die (“Brave Strangers”) and loneliness is only temporarily resolved by a one-nighter (“We’ve Got Tonight”).

Stranger In Town is classic Seger heartland rock, mixing ballads and slower tracks with uptempo rockers (the kickin’ “Feel Like A Number” is one of his best). You can download my top 25 Bob Seger playlist (click here) from Dr. Rock's Playlist Vault (click here) or purchase a CD of Stranger In Town from Amazon (click here).

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Monday, May 3, 2010

 

Album of the Day: Aerosmith (5/3/76) 34 Years!

Aerosmith was rocking the world after their third studio albums, Toys In The Attic reached #11 in 1975 and elevated them well beyond the cult-status they achieved in and around Boston. The follow-up, Rocks was released on May 3, 1976, cementing their position in the hearts, minds and ears of global hard rock and early metal fans and becoming the top-selling Aerosmith album in the 70s. And for good reason. Like its predecessor, it’s unabashed, straight ahead rock with all the raw power and raunchy swagger that gushed from Aerosmith in their first decade.

Faux-cowboy rocker “Back In The Saddle” and the hard funk of “Lost Child” created Top 40 hits (a third single, “Home Tonight” made it to #71) for the album. Along with “Walk This Way” and “Sweet Emotion,” Aerosmith issued four great and lasting rock hits in just over a year, and the four concert staples and catalog standards for the bands in the years since. Of course, two songs don’t make a good album, so you’ll need to listen to the rest, including the Joe Perry-penned, dueling vocals of “Combination,” the metal-influencing, often-covered “Nobody’s Fault,” and the steel guitar of the closing ballad “Home Tonight.”

Rocks is ranked #176 on Rolling Stone magazine’s Top 500 albums of all time. You can download my Aerosmith playlist in Dr. Rock Playlist Vault and Rocks is available on Amazon but not on iTunes. Rock on!

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Sunday, May 2, 2010

 

This Week's Birthdays (May 2 - 8)

Happy Birthday this week to:

May 02
1929 ● Frederick Lincoln "Link" Wray → Rock guitar pioneer, "Rumble" (1958)
1933 ● John "Bunk" GardnerMothers of Invention
1936 ● Engelbert Humperdinck (Arnold George Dorsey) → The "King of Romance"
1944 ● Bob Henrit Kinks, Argent
1945 ● Goldy McJohnSteppenwolf
1945 ● Randy Cain → Delfonics
1946 ● Lesley Gore (Goldstein) → "It's My Party" (1963)
1948 ● Larry Gatlin → The Gatlin Brothers, solo
1950 ● Lou GrammForeigner
1951 ● John GlascockJethro Tull
1954 ● Prescott Niles → The Knack
1955 ● Jo Callis → Human League
1985 ● Lily Allen → Brit popster, "Smile" 2006

May 03
1903 ● Harry Lillis "Bing" Crosby → "White Christmas" (1942)
1919 ● Pete Seeger → The Weavers, solo
1933 ● James Brown → The "Godfather of Soul"
1934 ● Frankie Valli (Francis Castelluccio) → The Four Seasons, solo
1944 ● Peter Staples → The Troggs, "Wild Thing" (1966)
1948 ● John Richardson → The Rubettes, Shows
1950 ● Mary Hopkin → "Those Were The Days" (1968)
1951 ● Christopher Cross (Geppert) → "Sailing" (1980)
1953 ● Bruce HallREO Speedwagon
1959 ● David Ball → Soft Cell

May 04
1923 ● Ed Cassidy → Rising Sons, Spirit
1928 ● Maynard Ferguson → Jazz trumpeteer
1937 ● Dick Dale (Richard Anthony Monsour) → The "King of the Surf Guitar"
1941 ● David LaFlamme → It's A Beautiful Day
1941 ● Richard Burns → The Hondells, "Little Honda" (1964)
1942 ● Nickolas Ashford → Ashford & Simpson
1943 ● Ronnie Bond (Bullis) → The Troggs, "Wild Thing" (1966)
1944 ● Peggy Santiglia → The Angels, "My Boyfriend's Back" (1963)
1945 ● George WadeniusBlood, Sweat & Tears
1945 ● Zal Cleminson → Alex Harvey Band
1951 ● Jackie Jackson → The Jackson 5
1959 ● Jay Aston → Bucks Fizz
1959 ● Randy Travis (Traywick) → "Hard Rock Bottom Of Your Heart" (1990)
1972 ● Mike Dirnt → Green Day
1979 ● Lance Bass → ‘N Sync

May 05
1937 ● Johnnie Taylor → R&B/soul, "Disco Lady" (1968)
1942 ● Tammy Wynette (Virginia W. Pugh) → "Stand By Your Man" (1968)
1945 ● Bob Seger → "Night Moves" (1976)
1950 ● Doug GrayMarshall Tucker Band
1959 ● Ian McCulloch → Echo & The Bunnymen
1962 ● Kevin Mooney → Adam & The Ants
1964 ● Lorraine McIntosh → Deacon Blue
1981 ● Craig David → Neo-R&B, "Fill Me In" (2000)
1988 ● Adele (Adkins) → Indie pop, "Chasing Pavements" (2008)
1989 ● Chris Brown → R&B/pop, "Run It!" (2005)

May 06
1936 ● Sylvia Vanderpool Robinson → Mickey & Sylvia, "Love Is Strange" (1957)
1939 ● Herbie Cox → The Cleftones
1942 ● Colin Earl → Foghat, Mungo Jerry
1945 ● Jimmie Dale Gilmore → The Flatlanders, solo
1948 ● Bill WardBlack Sabbath
1948 ● Mary MacGregor → "Torn Between Two Lovers" (1976)
1950 ● Robbie McIntosh → Average White Band
1960 ● John Flansburgh → They Might Be Giants
1960 ● Larry Steinbachel → Bronski Beat
1964 ● Tony Scalzo → Fastball
1967 ● Mark Bryan → Hootie & The Blowfish

May 07
1931 ● Teresa Brewer → "A Tear Fell" (1956)
1932 ● Derek TaylorBeatles PR manager
1939 ● Jimmy Ruffin → "What Becomes Of The Broken-Hearted" (1966)
1939 ● Johnny Maestro → The Crests, Brooklyn Bridge
1943 ● Rick West → The Tremeloes
1946 ● Arcelio Garcia → Malo
1946 ● Jerry Nolan → New York Dolls, The Heartbreakers
1946 ● Ray Monette → Rare Earth, Funkadelic
1948 ● Pete Wingfield → Sessions, backing bands, producer
1949 ● Keith (James Barry Keefer) → "98.6" (1967)
1950 ● Charles L'Empereur "Prairie" Prince → Tubes, Journey, New Cars
1956 ● Anne Dudley → Art Of Noise
1958 ● Marty Willson-Piper → The Church, solo
1961 ● Phil Campbell → Motörhead
1971 ● Eagle-Eye Cherry → "Save Tonight" (1998)

May 08
1940 ● Eric Hillard "Ricky" Nelson → "Hello Mary Lou" (1961)
1941 ● John Fred (Gourier) → (& His Playboy Band) "Judy In Disguise" (1968)
1943 ● Danny Whitten → Crazy Horse
1943 ● Paul Samwell-Smith → Yardbirds, Renaissance
1943 ● Toni Tennille → The Captain & Tennille
1944 ● Gary Glitter (Paul Francis Gadd) → "Rock & Roll, Pt. 2" (1972)
1945 ● Keith Jarrett → Jazz pianist
1951 ● Chris FrantzTalking Heads
1951 ● Philip Bailey → Earth, Wind & Fire
1953 ● Alex Van HalenVan Halen
1953 ● Billy BurnetteFleetwood Mac, solo
1964 ● Dave Rowntree → Blur
1972 ● Darren Hayes → Savage Garden
1975 ● Enrique Iglesias → Latin pop, son of Julio, "Bailamos" (1999)

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